Repolishing

Repolishing.co.uk is run as a one-man business by Gavin Mason, a Modern French Polisher and Cabinet Maker, with a strong background in furniture manufacturing. (View CV on LinkedIn)

Experienced in high end reproduction, replica and bespoke furniture, Gavin specialises in all the finishes you see in furniture stores today, and from the 1920’s onwards. As at 2013 Gavin is the only Ercol recommended repolisher in the South-East.

Did you know there are 4 kinds of French Polisher? (see below).

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Antique Restorers

Antique Restorers, whose skills include the 19th century art of Traditional French Polishing, use shellac, alcohol and linseed oil to build up a one coat glossy finish to authentically restore furniture from that period.

Shellac French polishing was discontinued commercially in the 1920’s, in favour of more durable sprayed lacquers which - in combination with spray stains, dyes, tints, shades – is now the work of the Modern French Polisher.

Modern French Polishers

Modern French Polishers can be found in furniture factories throughout the world, and the variety of finishes they produce can be seen in any good furniture store today.

So for 1920’s Art Deco, to 1960’s Ercol, and from 1980’s Reproduction, to 21st century designer pieces - and everything else in between, including high quality internal joinery - you need an experienced Modern French Polisher.

Franchised Repairers

Franchised Repairers will visit you at home and, with specialised repair kits, can improve scratches and other blemishes.

This can be quite effective for minor damage, or where perfection is not required, and without the inconvenience of your furniture being taken away.

Don’t expect too much though, and certainly not the rejuvenation of having the piece entirely repolished.

Painters & Decorators

Traditionally, Painters & Decorators were also French Polishers but alas no more. These days they sometimes pass themselves off as French Polishers using the DIY products for sale in the Decorator’s Merchants.

In the hands of someone skilled with a brush, these can be quite acceptable for ordinary internal joinery. But not, of course, for fine furniture, or where a “furniture quality finish” is desired.